MANAGEMENT RELATIONS IN THE WORK CULTURE IN JAPAN AS COMPARED TO THAT OF THE WEST

Ruth Wolf

Abstract


This article will discuss the Japanese work culture, its advantages and shortcomings. Emphasis is placed on the unique and productive industrial relations in the country, which are the fruits of an ancient tradition that views work as a privilege and not only an obligation. The article presents unique outlooks on business conduct in Japan, including reasons having to do with human capital, which are unique to this culture. Such conduct can serve as a living example for other economies. Even in this country one hears about mistakes made in business conduct but there is no doubt that the special human relations in this work culture are part of the reason for the economy’s success, strength and uniqueness.

 This article will, therefore, explain the work culture that existed in Japan prior to its most recent fall into an economic recession.

                One of the important principles in Japan is the virtue of work. Japan’s approach to work involves paying attention to the needs of the employee. A company owner or manager in Japan generally sees himself as responsible for his employee not only at the limited work level, but overall he is also concerned for his employee’s personal and familial welfare. This is in contrast to the American outlook, for example, which holds great consideration for the interests of the company’s shareholders in order to maximize their profits.


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